Moonfleet

Recognizing the familiar in the atypical; that sounds like the kind of triumphant banality commonly attached to a piece of cod sociological theorizing. In fact, it’s just my own clumsy way of pointing out how even the apparently uncharacteristic works of great filmmakers are frequently nothing of the sort. When one has in mind Fritz Lang’s time in Hollywood it’s tempting to think of film noir and leave it at that. However, that would be not only a mistake but a disservice to a man whose mastery of cinema meant that genre labels represented no limit, but instead offered extended opportunities to tackle the themes which interested him. Moonfleet (1955), despite its smugglers and 18th century trappings, is recognizably a Lang film and features elements that crop up all through his  work.

Young John Mohune (Jon Whiteley) is an orphan, on his way to the village of Moonfleet on the Dorset coast to look up the man his mother told him to find after she had passed. With a lowering sky and a deserted road, the atmosphere is already vaguely threatening and a tumbledown churchyard watched over by a stone angel heighten that feeling. When a claw-like hand is suddenly thrust from below the ground, well we’re veering into the realms of a Gothic nightmare. That sense is hardly dispelled when the youngster awakens in a local tavern to see a gallery of grotesques gazing down on him. Nevertheless,  he’s a phlegmatic type and unfazed by the experience, which is just as well as he’s about to witness a flogging and a shooting, carried out by the man he’s been traveling to see. Jeremy Fox (Stewart Granger) is an ambiguous character, a man of some means but clearly a rogue too. It’s apparent that Fox and the boy’s mother had been close but it’s also plain that he’s reluctant to have responsibility for the child’s welfare thrust upon him. The lad is a determined sort though, neither intimidated by the violence all around nor the dissipated and bawdy company his new guardian regularly keeps. As the trappings of a horror movie ebb and flow like the tide itself, the adventurous elements of the story gradually dominate, with the prospect of lost treasure being recovered, and all the romance that promises. While the characters hunt for a fabulous diamond, the fact is both Fox and young Mohune are mining for a different kind of treasure, the former slowly coming to the realization that he might just have a chance of regaining some semblance of the honor he’d thought forfeit and the latter, well his treasure is the boundless optimism of youth and a simple faith in the the notion of friendship.

A colorful CinemaScope adventure with swashbuckling elements is unlikely to be the first mental image conjured up with the mention of a Fritz Lang film. Nevertheless, as I said above, Lang wasn’t a servant of any particular genre. He even made a number of westerns – Western Union, The Return of Frank James, Rancho Notorious – with varying degrees of success and all of those were at the very least interesting and bore signs of the director’s stamp. His films frequently deal with concepts of justice, of an uneasy relationship between morality and hypocrisy, where ambiguity resides on the periphery of society and the facade of respectability is ever at risk of slipping and revealing something altogether less savory underneath. Moonfleet weaves all of this into the fabric of its narrative and the heavy reliance on sets and the studio backlot suit the director better; with Robert Planck’s cinematography casting brooding shadows, Lang creates some wonderfully atmospheric tableaux in the church, the cemetery and the crypt below, where the monuments to the past watch impassively over the  intrigues of the present, all punctuated by the rich score of Miklos Rozsa.

Moonfleet is a movie with what I would term a deep cast, meaning there is an abundance of well known and instantly recognizable performers right down the list. Despite that, the focus remains firmly on Stewart Granger and Jon Whiteley at all times. Granger had a real flair for playing characters who had a dismal opinion of themselves, if not outright villains then heroes (or perhaps even anti-heroes) burdened with doubt and locked into a lifetime of regret. His Jeremy Fox quite literally carries the scars of a thwarted love, and there is the sense of some distant guilt hanging heavy on his conscience. His courtship of villainy and vice feels more like a self-imposed punishment than an indulgence. His potential redeemer comes in the form of Whiteley, who it is strongly hinted but never explicitly confirmed may be his own son. It’s not so much the innocent adoration but perhaps more the steadfast belief of the boy that imbues the man with the moral courage he thought he had squandered. There is something both moving and uplifting about the coda that brings the movie to a close, where Whiteley throws open the gate to his ancestral home, opening up the path to a better future and asserting in response to the doubts cast by the parson whether his guardian will ever return, not with boldness but with a simplicity borne of conviction: “He’s my friend.”

As for the rest of the cast, the majority play types of varying degrees of worthlessness. George Sanders could take on the part of a cad  with his eyes closed, his debauched and decaying aristocrat, purring with honeyed ennui plots and schemes in vain. His faithless wife is portrayed in her trademark slinky style by Joan Greenwood, a woman who will be forever associated with the role of Sibella in Kind Hearts and Coronets in this viewer’s mind. The striking Viveca Lindfors is a venomous blend of the pitiful and the malignant as Fox’s spurned mistress, beautifully framed with a serpent as companion in the image above, although I feel she’s underused. To some extent, the same could said of Melville Cooper, John Hoyt, Dan Seymour, Jack Elam and, in his final screen role, the unforgettable Skelton Knaggs.  Sean McClory fares better as the dissatisfied innkeeper/smuggler and gets to shine in one of the movie’s big set pieces – the face-off with Granger, where he swings a cruel looking halberd, must have been something to behold projected on the big screen.

Moonfleet has been released on Blu-ray by Warner Brothers but, for now at least, I’m still reliant on my old French DVD. It’s been a while since I last watched anything by Lang, which is odd as he has always been one of my favorite directors, and I’ve had it in mind to feature this title for some time. I believe it hasn’t the greatest reputation among Lang’s works but I like it a lot. It has mood and atmosphere, chills and adventure sharing screen space with tried and tested themes of the director, and what’s even more  important, there’s a positivity and buoyancy at its core that I cannot fail but respond to.

62 thoughts on “Moonfleet

  1. Only seen this the once, about 30 years ago I think (probably when TCM was available in the UK). It didn’t make much of an impression to be honest but am not sure I tried very hard. Late Lang tends overall to feel a bit less tight than his earlier work … but in fact I have found some of it really rewarding on re-viewing. Thanks Colin, clearly must try again!

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    • It’s sometimes tempting to expect the same type of material time and again from filmmakers but I think it often means we end up if not dismissing then feeling disappointment when certain works don’t tally with those expectations we imposed. Lang does have some themes that crop up regularly in his work but that’s not to say he was trying to make the same movie over and over; there’s a lot of range and variety in his body of work. I like the adventure of this film, and its hopefulness. And I like Lang’s reliance on sets and the backlot to create the film’s own world. So yes, by al means give it another try when the opportunity arises.

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            • Thanks for posting this documentary about Lang’s efforts to improve a thematically unbalanced script. At least it allowed me to have an appreciation of what Lang tried to accomplish. Visually and atmospherically speaking it was all Fritz Lang. Consequently, because of the improved and enhanced staging he was even able to tighten things up somewhat thematically. However, with little help from the actors and characters portrayed there of, I found too much of it to be an unconvincing preposterous bore. As scripted, perhaps this was a film better left alone as a novel.

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              • Other than the title and a few details, there is very little similarity between the film and novel. I thought it was a bore, especially without Stewart Granger not the page to entertain us.

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                  • Barry, I know what you mean. Stewart Granger, the man, with all his flamboyancy, was undoubtedly the main ‘attraction’…….or maybe more appropriately………the main ‘distraction’. Disappointingly, the supporting character roles played by George Sanders and the young boy fell well short of their purpose.
                    Giving just credit to Lang, however, in his efforts to salvage a sinking ship, he did give us a very well put together ending…..unfortunately, it was not enough to swing the tide.

                    Liked by 1 person

  2. Colin
    Never seen this one. But of course, as you say, Lang is Lang, and always worth a look. Granger, Sanders, Greenwood etc and composer Miklos Rozsa .all come across as an added bonus. Thanks for the heads up.
    Gord

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  3. Hi Colin, long time no contact… This is one I really quite like, and I covered it some years ago on my blog. I especially enjoy how, told from John’s perspective, the graveyard has an additional supernatural feel and the buccaneers leering over him come across as equally demonic, also the way Fox is characterised as a swashbuckling hero, quite at odds with what’s actually going on. I’m tempted to watch it again right now – it’s very fine, matinee fare.

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    • Hello there! I can’t tell you how pleased I am to hear from you again, Mike. You did indeed feature this movie in the past – and it can be found here.
      I think the fact so much of the movie is seen from John’s perspective adds great charm to it all and contrasts nicely with the cynicism inherent in the life Fox finds himself following.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. A few not so random thoughts; this is not a Lang picture in any true sense but was prepared by John Houseman who brought Lang on board two weeks prior to principal photography. Secondly, the new executive suite at MGM, headed by Dore Schary grew faint-hearted with the studio and the industry’s decline and was soon replaced by, metaphorically speaking, butchers and bakers. Or film salesmen, who threw away some of their best product, such as Ride The High Country. As for Viveca Lindfors, she was edited out, or down, in the film. At least Stewart Granger, who I know somewhat, was kept front and center, though he hated the finished product even more than he hated Lang, not unusual.

    About Granger, I did not know him well enough to call him a friend or even good acquaintance, but he was the most fun of anyone I have ever met. A grand guy.

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        • Musings on justice, social hypocrisy, the facade of respectability to name a few? The trappings of the era depicted and the allusions to swashbucklers are present but Lang’s sensibility is there too.

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          • Like all of Lang’s films it starts to make sense when you keep in mind that he was a Catholic. He may have been the most Catholic of all major film-makers, much more so than Hitchcock.

            That’s why modern critics persistently misunderstand Lang. His Catholic sensibility is too foreign to them. They keep rabbiting on about fate. Lang was a very very strong believer in free will.

            It amuses me greatly that on IMDb you can find Lang included in a list of non-religious film directors.

            Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice spotlight on a film I’ve always enjoyed and that’s mainly for two reasons. I’d seen it as a youngster om TV and it had a Treasure Island appeal I suppose. Secondly for whatever reason my Grade 10 English teacher assigned the class to read the novel. Now to be honest I’ve forgotten the novel and if it was all that close to the movie but I did pick up an old antique copy I came across so maybe I’ll give it a go after all these years.

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    • I have a old paperback copy of the novel though it remains unread as yet. By all accounts, there are significant differences between the text and the movie, which is something I often enjoy as I find I’m more inclined to seek out material where big changes have occurred as a result of adaptation.

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      • Firstly, Colin, Let me recommend that you pull out that copy of J. Meade Falkner’s novel. I read that at school nearly 60 years ago as it was part of our English course and the book was, I found anyway, a most enjoyable read. Apart from John Mohune, the character that really stood out was Elzevir Block (maybe it was the name!!).
        It was some years later that I saw the film and, as can often happen, it seemed a slight letdown after the novel but a re-view later showed the film as an enjoyable ride on its own merits.

        I have watched Stewart Granger in films all my life and I remember an interview (maybe Parkinson) where he sold himself short. As the years have gone by I have come to really appreciate the actor’s work. He had that elusive quality in spades – screen presence.

        And (hope I’m not rambling on here), pure coincidence that I happened to watch another of Fritz Lang’s films just this week when I watched “MAN HUNT” (1941), the Hollywood version of Geoffrey Household’s “Rogue Male” (incidentally again with Sanders). This was no film noir either of course.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Would agree with Jerry’s comment regarding the novel. I also haven’t read the book since I was a kid but I do remember that the narrative descent into the Mohune vault engendered a genuine sense of dread that Moonfleet the movie, excellent though it may be, didn’t come close to recapturing in the couple of times I’ve seen it. For me Moonfleet needed to be shot in black and white by someone like David Lean. It needed a few ‘Magwitch emerging from behind a gravestone’ moments in the style of ‘Great Expectations’. It needed a little less gloss and a little more grime.

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  7. It’s interesting to hear how some reactions the the movie have been colored to a degree by comparisons made with the novel on which it was based. This is a matter which arises from time to time and I know I’m happy to take different media as they are; that difference in media plays some role in how we process the material of course but the fact an adaptation necessarily requires another person (or indeed a team) to present their interpretation is not only inevitable, but perhaps should be regarded as a bonus too. Almost slavish devotion to original texts can yield dull results on occasion but, more importantly, I try to keep in mind the fact that an adaptation represents a different voice and consequently a different set of objectives on the filmmaker’s part. As ever, the crucial question, to my mind anyway, is whether the filmmaker has succeeded in achieving those objectives – in short, are we watching a coherent and entertaining movie where the “voice” of the filmmaker can be discerned?

    As an aside, I think I mentioned at some point in the past that my preference is to come upon a movie adaptation first before reading the source material. Generally, I’ve found that approach more rewarding, although your mileage may vary on that score.

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  8. Colin
    Till my late 20’s or so, films that varied from the book drove me crazy. Then it just dawned on me that it was more a case of did I enjoy the film or not?

    Now I go along with your take and prefer to see the film first. Life is short enough without getting upset over how close the adaptation is.

    Gord

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    • I should maybe add that this doesn’t mean it’s necessary to embrace or enjoy every change that comes about via the process of adaptation. Ultimately, it does come down to whether or not filmmakers have produced something that works on screen, that has integrity in its own right, and that fulfills its own goals. And it’s worth remembering that none of this actually affects the essence of the original source.

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  9. Maybe my reference to ‘Great Expectations’ was an inadvertent nudge towards the fact that it’s possible to bring so many unconscious prejudices to a movie that it can stop one giving it a fair shake. In the case of Moonfleet, the book obviously made an indelible impression through having been imbibed at such a young age. In fact, everyone seems to have read this while at school! Another recent example of this syndrome was the new Perry Mason TV series. This expensively produced, well acted and probably realistic evocation of the darker side of thirties Los Angeles can never compete with the hundreds of Raymond Burr episodes I’ve enjoyed or even the high octane Warren William / Ricardo Cortez B-movies. One simply looks at Matthew Rhys’s shabby protagonist and say “Nah… that’s not Perry Mason….”. However, had it been simply been called anything other than Perry Mason then I could have enjoyed it on its own merits. I will be revisiting this one at some point….

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    • Fair point. While I’ve not seen any the new Perry Mason adaptations I have heard fans of the books express dissatisfaction with the portrayal and of certainly doesn’t sound anything like the character I know via the books or the TV series with Raymond Burr. Of course, Gardner altered his approach over the years and the Mason of the 30s is quite different from the Mason of the 50s and the TV show.
      I had, and have similar issues with the recent Phelps adaptations of Christie’s stories. They irritate me deeply and o find them unwatchable, bit that’s as much down to a dislike of the visual aesthetic chosen as well as a strong objection to what comes across as a bumptious and arrogant attitude from the screenwriter – I’m actually a big fan of many of the more fanciful and freewheeling adaptations of Christie’s work over the years.

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    • Nicely made point, but had the new Perry Mason been called Roy Rogers, I still would not like it; far too modern a take, and I do mean politically.

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      • No, I didn’t take to the ‘new’ Perry Mason either (I had expected to like it…possibly) but turned off after a couple of episodes.
        I also agree with Colin’s irritation at the most recent TV adaptations of Mrs Christie’s stories. They have become increasingly tiresome. If they can’t respect the author enough to follow the feel of her stories then please leave them alone.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Colin
    I know you are an Audie Murphy fan, and as it so happens, one that I have never seen is coming on TCM here on the 11th. BAD BOY 1949 with Murphy, Lloyd Nolan and Jane Wyatt. Is it worth recording in your opinion?

    On a side note. In the last 45 days or so we have went from Minus 30 C to Plus 32. A nice pleasant Plus 18 or so would be so nice.

    Gord

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  11. LOL What is this? A Murphy film you have not seen! Nice to know I am not the only one in the dark.

    Any of you other good people seen BAD BOY?

    Gord

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    • Just recently actually, Gord! First time I had seen it. Audie did not yet show the confidence on screen that he developed a couple of years later but Lloyd Nolan was the other reason to watch it. Not bad.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes Gord……just as Jerry did I just took it in. Considering the cast it’s everything you might expect. You can also access the movie online.

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  12. For me the highlights are Rozsa’s swirling “seascape” (as he later called it) and the boy’s fall and wonderfully horrific awakening. Mostly downhill after that, with the long “outwitting the guards while finding the MacGuffin” sequence the absolute nadir. Evidently they shot the ending in at least three different versions — Rozsa had to score all of them — and overrode Lang’s choice.

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  13. Interesting how many people recalled reading the novel in childhood. In America it’s much less familiar. I had never heard of it. The novel’s Chesil Beach setting is doubtless better known to Brits than Yanks. It’s a distinctive stony shingle quite unlike the crashing California coast of the movie. Chesil Beach plays a prominent role in the tense bomb-disposal climax of Powell-Pressburger’s quirky “Small Back Room.” In fact, Powell’s desire to use that setting was the genesis of that film. More recently there was an awkward marital drama with Saorise Ronan, called “On Chesil Beach.”

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    • Schools and set texts can play a role in ensuring some are more familiar with certain books. I don’t recall it being all that well-known when I was growing up in Northern Ireland, and I’m not acquainted with the setting either to be honest. I know I picked up a 2nd hand copy years ago basically because I knew the movie and so the title caught my eye.

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  14. the fact is both Fox and young Mohune are mining for a different kind of treasure, the former slowly coming to the realisation that he might just have a chance of regaining some semblance of the honour he’d thought forfeit

    Yes. In just about every Lang film you’ll find the theme of redemption. Lang was in my personal view the most Catholic of all major Catholic film-makers. He was a more Catholic film-maker than Hitchcock. Redemption, and the issue of free will. It’s always there. Sometimes his heroes find redemption and sometimes they don’t but the choice is always available to them.

    It’s the reason Lang is so often misunderstood. He considered his films to be essentially optimistic, but it’s never cheap and easy optimism.

    BTW I’m not a Catholic myself but for some reason I seem to be drawn to the books and films of Catholic writers and film-makers (like Graham Greene).

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    • I’m Catholic myself but I never thought of that actively affecting my reaction to movies. That said, I do respond to and I frequently find myself drawn to movies which feature these themes, although I feel sure that’s on a humanistic and broader philosophical level rather than as a result of any direct connection to my upbringing. I think the fact too that so many people from a whole range of backgrounds also get hooked by such themes, indeed that the themes frequently resonate strongly with them, indicates how such ideas transcend the boundaries and deal with universal concepts and concerns.

      By the way,this comment got diverted to the spam folder for some odd reason and I just now discovered it and dug it out.

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    • Not sure why “redemption and free will” should be associated with Roman Catholicism. Filmmakers from Bergman to Zinnemann have dealt with such themes. Graham Greene is another matter. He wrote extensively about particular R.C. beliefs and practices.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. FILMS FOR THE WEEKEND ARE…
    Merrill’s Marauders. 1962 with Jeff Chandler and directed by Sam Fuller. I have not seen this one since high school. It was Chandler’s last film before his untimely death..

    High School Confidential 58. Never seen this one but what a cast for a JD film, John Drew Barrymore, Russ Tamblyn, Michael Landon, Jackie Coogan, Jerry Lee Lewis, Mamie Van Doren and Jan Sterling. Jack (Creature from the Black Lagoon) Arnold directs.

    And to finish the weekend, the excellent Boer War film, Breaker Morant 1980. This court-martial drama stars, Edward Wood Woodward, Bryan Brown and Jack Thompson. Nicely put together by director Bruce Beresford.

    Gordon

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    • Hi Gord……
      RE: HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL This film borders on some pretty raw adult themed material in a supposed juvenile setting. From what I’ve researched, government sensors were involved throughout production. Consequently, a major change in casting was made just before filming began in early February. Well known veteran gangster actor George Raft was signed to play a central role as Mr. A. Also, in early February it was reported by Hedda Hopper that Raft was “off to Florida”, without any further explanation why. However, according to MGM, Raft wasn’t actually replaced by Jackie Coogan until March. One can only speculate the reasoning behind the timing and transitioning of Raft to Coogan. Was the presence of Raft and his on screen underworld persona too much an issue with the sensors? As far as the casting of Jackie Coogan is concerned, he delivered a very convincing performance in the overall scheme of things.
      Enjoy this one Gord.

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  16. I have the Warner Archive Blu Ray of MOONFLEET and in the appealing
    2.55 ratio it’s a visual treat.
    I enjoyed your review but for me the narrative is all over the shop
    but visually the film is so appealing, it’s an easy watch when I’m in
    the mood for colourful escapism.
    Of course a Lang film should be much more than that but as Barry
    stated earlier it was a truobled production and Granger despised Lang.
    Regarding Sean McClory and Catholic directors just recently I caught up
    with John Farrow’s PLUNDER OF THE SUN.
    For some reason I always thought the film was a “Secret Of The Incas”
    type adventure and not the Noir it actually is;when all is said and
    done I should have checked out your vintage review ages ago.
    I enjoyed Mr McClory in Peter Lorre mode as the heavy and the
    Mexican locations added to the film greatly.
    Glenn Ford,on top form as the misanthropic loner, anti hero.
    I was not expecting too much from PLUNDER OF THE SUN but it
    far exceeded my expectations,fast moving full of twists and turns
    that keep you guessing throughout.
    BAD BOY mentioned earlier is a good social drama and soon after
    Audie teamed up again with Kurt Neumann for THE KID FROM
    TEXAS. This time Neumann and Murphy hit box office gold
    and their fast moving hit launched Murphy as a box office
    winner for Universal.

    Liked by 1 person

    • PLUNDER OF THE SUN…….a film I had never seen or much less heard of. John K, thanks for bringing this film to light. Not great, but with noir elements of mysterious characters set in atmospheric locations of Cuba and Mexico proved to be quite entertaining. For some reason, I saw shades of an Orson Welles influence here. It was probably because of the character portrayal and excellent performance of Sean McClory. Who’s ever idea it was to give Sean a shady appearance with bleached-blond crew-cut hair and dark glasses was genius. That alone kept him a lurking central focus, with the ever present thought of being friend or foe, would eventually be someone to reckon with. For me, McClory and his character was a difference maker.

      Liked by 1 person

      • A side note about Sean McClory according to Wikipedia………..

        “When McClory had no acting jobs, he turned to other employment, including washing dishes, driving trucks, working at a gold mine on the California-Nevada border and sailing around the world. At one point, he sold his blood to obtain money for food and drinks.”

        Ya gotta love a guy like this.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. I got PLUNDER OF THE SUN in a Noir Box Set and
    seeing it’s inculsion I thought “What’s that doing there”
    I’ve watched the film once and again with the commentary and
    can now see that the film is more Noir than anything else.
    There’s a couple of potential shocking scenes (for the era)
    where Glenn Ford pulls open Patricia Medina’s robe,
    she is wearing undergarments but the audience feels Ford
    could not have known this.
    Even more shocking is where Ford makes self confessed
    “tramp” Diana Lynn face herself in the mirror….
    “Take a good look at yourself…who’d want to kiss that”
    One feels Ford is being cruel to be kind but the scene smacks
    of refined Puritanism,especially as Lynn had taken Ford’s cigarette
    and drags on it herself an action more typical of a couple in a
    relationship
    I am not familar with Diana Lynn’s other work but found her
    performance in this film both appealing and disarming
    She is certainly a “Tramp” not to mention a “lush” to remember..
    The Noir credentials are further enforced by the many low angle
    shots showing extensive views of ceilings..I like ceilings.
    Add the ever entertaining Francis L Sullivan a Noir character
    if ever there was one.
    And then there’s Glenn Ford in his element as the “All American
    Anti Hero”

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    • Quote John K, “……..Glenn Ford pulls open Patricia Medina’s robe,
      she is wearing undergarments but the audience feels Ford
      could not have known this.”
      Ford’s cabin had just been ransacked so he was looking for clues of who the culprit(s) were. He first suspected Medina. Ford then enters her cabin to see if she was dressed or had been slumbering. Ford forcibly pulls open Medina’s robe to find she was dressed and accuses her of searching his cabin. Medina denies it. The act, in itself, was no doubt a jolt to the audience. However, with some, it was probably a disappointment not to see Medina in her undergarments. lol.

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  18. Thanks Barry
    I’d like to see more of Diana Lynn who passed away
    at such a young age.
    One of her more high profile films was THE KENTUCKIAN
    which I’ve never seen.
    The Francis L Sullivan character was identical (including
    wheelchair) to the part he played in HELL’S ISLAND
    a Noir in Technicolor and VistaVision
    HELL’S ISLAND has similar plot elements to
    PLUNDER IN THE SUN and also has Mary Murphy in a
    career best turn as the Femme Fatale.
    HELL’S ISLAND needs a Blu Ray release.

    Liked by 1 person

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