Damn Citizen

Today we have a genuine rarity (at least it fits my definition of the term) placed under the spotlight in another guest post courtesy of regular visitor Gordon Gates.

This is another of those unseen Universal International productions that really needs a general release. Damn Citizen (1958) is a by the numbers documentary style noir about police corruption. The story is based on real events and people. It stars Keith Andes as Col Francis Grevemberg. Grevemberg, an ex-army officer, is offered the command of the Louisiana State Police. Louisiana was at the time considered to be the most corrupt State in the Union.

Everyone seems in on the scam with officers looking the other way for their cut of the action. Every time Andes raids a gambling club or bordello, they find the place has been warned. So Andes decides to fire most of the force and start from scratch.

 He starts a rigorous screening and training course hoping to weed out the crooks. When this fails, Andes decides to play the mob’s game and sends officer Jeffery Stone undercover. Stone pretends to be a crooked cop and gets himself thrown off the force. Some of the other fired cops have been working as gunmen etc. for the gambling mob and Stone is quickly offered a job.
***SPOILER ALERT – HIGHLIGHT THE  FOLLOWING***

 Andes right hand man, Gene Evans, has also been working behind the scenes selling info to the crooks for the then hefty sum of $1,000 a week. Edward Platt plays the head of the mob. He offers Andes a bribe which is turned down. He then tries a bit of blackmail by having a woman peel off her duds in front of Andes while a cameraman snaps away.No dice, Andes steps up the pressure and Platt responds in kind. Someone pays a visit to Andes’ home and deposits the decapitated body of the family dog in his children’s bed. Then undercover cop Stone is murdered and his body left in Andes’ car. Now Evans steps forward and tells Andes about all the info he has collected by pretending to be an informant for the mob. 

Andes then forces an old friend, Lynn Bari, who is a member of the mob, to turn State’s evidence. Doors are soon kicked in and guns produced and used.

Platt and his boys are hauled off for a long holiday at the State’s expense.

*******************************END OF SPOILERS**********************

A real stand up policer with good work from the cast and crew. There is a small morals lecture at the start, but then the film goes right to speed and never lets up. Besides Andes, Bari, Evans and Platt, the cast includes Maggie Hayes, Ann Robinson and Clegg Hoyt.

It is always nice to see Gene Evans in anything. He has the gruff cop, military type or western black hat down to a fine art. Fixed Bayonets!Armored Car RobberyThe Steel Helmet, Wyoming Mail, The Long Wait, The Bravados, Park Row and Hell and High Water are just a few of his films.
Same thing with Lynn Bari. The slinky looker was called the “Woo Woo Girl” and was a popular pin-up girl during WW2. Pretty well only worked in B films but was a
pretty good actress.
The jazzy musical score is supplied by Henry Mancini of Peter Gunn and The Pink Panther fame.

The story is written by Stirling Silliphant whose work includes Nightfall, The Line-Up, and the series M-Squad, Naked City, Route 66 and Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

The d of p was Ellis W Carter who worked on The Human Jungle and the George Blair directed, Lonely Heart Bandits. ( A plug for Lonely Heart Bandits which is one of my fav low rent noir) Carter also lensed one of the better 50’s Sci-Fi classics, The Incredible Shrinking Man.

Director was low budget and television veteran Robert Gordon.

Availability is currently problematic and even an online viewing seems out of the question. There is however a trailer which gives a flavor of the movie.

EDIT: This link may bring up the movie itself – https://ok.ru/video/1223899810389

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Gordon Gates

116 thoughts on “Damn Citizen

  1. Gord, there are a lot of small films I have not only not seen but not even heard of, as I am recently discovering more and more, and this title is one of them. Sounds just up my sleazy, rainswept street!!
    Probably too much to hope this film might become available on DVD and it is one more U.I. film that should be. Thanks for making it known to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Same here, Jerry. I’d never heard of this till Gord passed me his write-up. It just goes to show how much material is out there and undiscovered by many.
      Keith Andes was in a succession of good movies throughout the 1950s and you would have though his big screen career would have remained stronger n the 60s.

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      • Colin
        As you say, Andes made a bunch of watchable films in the 50s He also made a very good Police series called, “This Man Dawson” 1959-60. I have seen about 15 of the episodes. Most of the series was produced and directed by William Conrad. I know that he worked up till 1980, but the only thing I recall him in after 1960 was a Joseph Pevney helmed episode called, “The Apple”, from “Star Trek” 1967.
        Gord

        Liked by 1 person

          • I recently saw in Andes in “Split Second” and remember him in “Clash by Night”. He was in two other films I watched, “Pillars of the Sky” and “Back from Eternity” but I don’t remember his performances. He seems to have been into bodybuilding from the photo of him on IMDB. Unfortunately, he took his own life at the age of 85 while suffering from bowel cancer.

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            • Frank, Keith had bladder cancer. I have a friend, not too close because they have largely disappeared, who is suffering from the same disease and thinking about doing the same thing. There are more and much better options today, but all scary.

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              • It’s a terrible disease to endure especially for the elderly who have so many other challenges to deal with. Keith did live to be 85, however. So many actors passed in their 50s or early 60s from heart attacks, lung cancer (smoking), or alcoholism (Bogart, Robert Taylor, Errol Flynn, Wendell Corey, Gail Russell, William Talman, Clark Gable, etc.) Unfortunately, people weren’t as knowledgeable about the dangers of smoking and excessive drinking back then as we are today.

                Liked by 1 person

  2. Jerry
    You are welcome for suggesting a new title for you. I just found the thing again on the net. Google OK.RU Damn Citizen and hopefully it will pop up. Tried the other day and it said the film was removed but it seems to be back again. If you can hook up to it, I know you will like it. I first saw it back in 2008. I have a few more of these U-I titles hidden away.
    Gord

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  3. All
    Between Colin and myself we now have a link to DAMN CITIZEN up. It is underneath the film trailer on my review.
    Gord

    Those looking for SPY HUNT can find it at the same site.

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  4. Thanks for sharing that. There are some tempting, had to find titles there (though some others are actually readily available on DVD). For myself, I’m always ambivalent about seeing these online. As usual, these are sharp images if one is willing to watch it in a small frame in the middle of the screen, but at full screen it all gets blurrier, at least on my laptop.

    I may give in to see a few of these again. I saw DAMN CITIZEN back in 1958, on a double bill with THE LADY TAKES A FLYER (directed by Jack Arnold, with Lana Turner and Jeff Chandler). Don’t remember it at all well now.

    Those who have wanted to see SWORD IN THE DESERT that we have discussed here should note that it is one of the films.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Blake
    The ones not on DVD are getting harder to find which annoys me no end. For the most part, I enjoy these U-I productions though I did watch one last night that was very weak. Arabian type adventure, THE GOLDEN BLADE from 1953 with Rock Hudson and Piper Laurie. Good thing George Macready and Gene Evans supplied the nasty type elements. Even the reliable director Nathan Juran could not save the terrible writing involved here.
    . Gord

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I like THE GOLDEN BLADE a lot, among this variable second wave (the U-I ones) of an Arabian nights cycle that began in the 40s with Maria Montez and those people, but THE PRINCE WHO WAS A THIEF (1951, directed by Rudolph Mate) is hands down the best. It’s wonderful, and rightfully launched Tony Curtis and Piper Laurie as stars.

    You have to get in a spirit of complete fantasy for these kinds of movies, and be somewhat light-hearted about them, and then they can become genuinely enchanting. Mate had the right sensibility for matinee type pictures–and I’m not saying that dismissively at all–and a real eye for the visual beauty that is possible there. PRINCE all takes place in beautifully designed interiors, a world that only exists in the film.

    To love Universal-International is to love a number of different kinds of movies in different genres–not just the Westerns and melodramas (and those sci-fi classics too) that most of cherish.

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    • Blake
      The Montez and Jon Hall films, ARABIAN NIGHTS, ALI BABA AND THE FORTY THIEVES and SUDAN are great fun, but GOLDEN BLADE did work for me. LOL We can’t all like the same films all the time. I agree wholeheartedly on the U-I Sci-Fi stuff. CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE and THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN are 50’s classics. U-I Noir and war films are my fav though. Westerns are still something I need to catch up on with you folks here.
      Gord

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  7. Just tried a lengthy post don’t know what happened
    so I’m going to try to recap my thouights and break it down in sections.
    Firstly well done Gordon,titles don’t come much more obscure than
    DAMN CITIZEN.
    Also very pleased to see the name drop for Ellis Carter and George Blair’s
    creepy LONELY HEARTS BANDITS.
    We have often beamoned the many missing Universal Noirs from the
    classic era (LARCENY,UNDER THE GUN,JOHNNY STOOL PIGEON,
    UNDERCOVER GIRL,PLAYGIRL, I could go on but I won’t)
    There are just as many obscure little thrillers from the late 50’s and
    list compiler that I am here goes: Richard Carlson’s APPOINTMENT WITH
    A SHADOW,Jack Arnold’s OUTSIDE THE LAW,THE TATTERED DRESS,
    Abner Biberman’s FLOOD TIDE,THE NIGHT RUNNER,RUNNING WILD and
    BEHIND THE HIGH WALL and three from Harry Keller MAN AFRAID, STEP DOWN
    TO TERROR and VOICE IN THE MIRROR.
    At the very least all of these films have interesting casts.
    Kino Lorber who have the main access to Universal’s vaults these days
    mainly only release films that have already appeared on DVD.
    A rare exception to this is NEVER STEAL ANYTHING SMALL.
    Perhaps eventually Kino will run out of released titles and have a go at
    the mountain of unreleased stuff.

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    • John
      Thanks for the kind words. I’m always sticking George Blair’s name up somewhere. A very under rated director in my opinion. I always wondered what he could do with a decent budget and better casts. Ellis Carter is another one who deserves more mention. I like your list of U-I noir, LARCENY,UNDER THE GUN,JOHNNY STOOL PIGEON, UNDERCOVER GIRL,PLAYGIRL, APPOINTMENT WITH
      A SHADOW, OUTSIDE THE LAW,THE TATTERED DRESS, FLOOD TIDE,THE NIGHT RUNNER,RUNNING WILD, BEHIND THE HIGH WALL and three from Harry Keller MAN AFRAID, STEP DOWN TO TERROR and VOICE IN THE MIRROR. Seen most of these except for the last 3 and PLAYGIRL and RUNNING WILD. Some where nice copies but most were however on poor vhs transfers.
      I have added your DEATH OVER MY SHOULDER (1959) to my list of films to look for.
      Gord

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Was never that keen on Keith Andes as a leading man,
    If I get a chance to see DAMN CITIZEN I might change my mind.
    I do remember that he was rather good in a supporting role in
    PILLARS OF THE SKY currently being prepped in high def
    by Kino Lorber.
    Maggie Hayes never really had the career that she deserved she was
    very good in GOOD DAY FOR A HANGING and excellent in a difficult
    role in Charles Haas’ THE BEAT GENERATION.
    Jerry might be interested to note that Haas’ companion piece
    THE BIG OPERATOR is due soon on Talking Pictures TV.
    The film is all over the shop and scores points for audacity but for all
    it’s many flaws I’m rather fond of it.
    As a sad footnote three of the cast of DAMN CITIZEN took their own
    lives,Keith Andes,that excellent actor Edward Platt and Sam Buffington
    best remembered for his supporting role in the biggest let down TV
    series ever Audie Murphy’s Whispering Smith,.

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  9. Luddite that I am I still refuse to watch films on-line
    it’s just not my thing.
    The one exception would be my Holy Grail of films
    DEATH OVER MY SHOULDER (1959) directed by Arthur Crabtree.
    I simply cannot find anything on line about this Brit B flick
    it’s one of those films that escaped as opposed to being released.
    If it did turn up on line (which it won’t) I will break my golden rule,
    you Google almost any film and something turns up but with
    DEATH OVER MY SHOULDER…nothing.

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  10. Regarding the various references to Universal International
    costume romps there are two on my “most wanted” to track down
    list.
    Firstly George Sherman’s THE VEILS OF BAGDAD with Victor Mature,
    Marie Blanchard,Guy Rolfe and James Arness.
    A bit later on the historical scale there’s Joseph Peveny’s YANKEE PASHA
    with the very enticing trio of Jeff Chandler,Rhonda Fleming and Mamie Van
    Doren
    Then much more up to date there’s LITTLE EGYPT with the incomparable
    Rhonda Fleming.
    Just so many great Universal International pictures on the missing list.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I just watched the movie online and found it so-so. It’s aiming for a very matter of fact documentary approach, and I’m not the biggest fan of the docu-noir variant at the best of times. In the case of Damn Citizen I feel the this late 50s noir style of looking at organizations and societies rather than the more intimate, internalized movies that characterized earlier examples of the style is pushed to extremes. For me, it was all a little too impersonal and detached, and Andes played it very straight and stiff. As a result, I had difficulties getting into the story, feeling any connection or involvement.
    Of course it does have plenty of incident and it all moves along nicely but despite a strong hook, the bait wasn’t of the type to snag this viewer firmly. That said, I’m glad i was brought to my attention and that I had the opportunity to see it.

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  12. Colin
    Myself, I like the straight up doc style stuff. They play out for me like DRAGNET episodes. No nonsense straight down the line. Having said that, I can understand totally why this style does not work for everyone. Be a boring world if we all saw things the same way.
    Cheers, Gord .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes indeed, all of us respond to different types and styles of movies in our own way. Taken on its own terms, this is a well made movie that is successful in capturing the documentary style it’s aiming for.

      Like

  13. Colin
    RED SUN 1972 is coming up on TCM here on Monday. I have not seen this since it was in the cinema back in the day. Great cast, Charles Bronson, Toshiro Mifune, Alain Delon. and Ursula Andress with Terence Young helming. I know you did a review of this one, but I am going to wait till I watch it before looking at your write-up. It has been so long that I want it to be like a new film. LOL
    Gord

    Liked by 1 person

  14. All
    A Gary Cooper film i have never seen, THE STORY OF DR. WASSELL 1944 is coming up on TCM here. Is it worth recording? The cast looks interesting, Laraine day, Signe Hasso, Dennis O’Keefe, Paul Kelly and Philip Ahn. DeMille directs. This one seems to have escaped me completely so what are your opinions on said film?
    Gord

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    • Gordon, not a typical DeMille spectacle. If that’s what you’re looking for you’ve come to the wrong place. But, no need to fret about that……DeMille does a masterful job of directing an excellently written true story and screenplay. Cooper is in good form along with the entire cast. If you like Cooper and a different sort of WW2 film it’s a must see.

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  15. Scott
    Was not sure what to make of it even though the comments on IMDB were pretty well all positive. I would rather ask you folks here for a take on the film..
    Thanks

    Gord

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  16. I went out of my ‘comfort zone’ this morning and watched “DAMN CITIZEN” online on my tablet (in bed!).
    I rather like these docu-noirs (eg “PHENIX CITY STORY”) though I take Colin’s point that this one was rather impersonalized. Enjoyed it though and thank Gordon for making it so easy for me to view!!

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    • The Phenix City Story is a well regarded movie but I didn’t have that great a time with it either. Again, I think it’s just a style of filmmaking that I’m not crazy about. But, you know, different strokes and all that.

      Like

  17. FILMS FOR THE WEEKEND
    This time around
    1- THE MAN FROM DAKOTA 1940
    2- Les Misérables 2019
    3- CODE OF THE SECERT SERVICE 40
    4- Sergeant Rutledge (1960)
    5- LOAN SHARK 1952

    Gord

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    • Not too sure yet, Gord. Yesterday I watched one of those Republic B films, “UNMASKED” (1950) directed by George Blair. Nice juicy role for Raymond Burr. Really rather enjoyed it.
      Today could see another B. I also have to find something my wife will enjoy too in the evening. We watched “THE INTIMATE STRANGER” (1956) last night. I wasn’t sure she would like it but she did, very much. Richard Basehart as a former Hollywood director now working in England. I enjoyed seeing Nettlefold Studios in London used for both exteriors and sound stages and Basehart and Mary
      Murphy alongside an all-British cast.

      Like

      • I liked The Intimate Stranger quite a lot when I saw it. The premise is intriguing, the locations are, as you say, attractive and Mary Murphy turns in a fine performance.

        Like

  18. Jerry
    UNMASKED is a quick programmer that runs 60 minutes and is quite fun. I enjoyed it myself when I saw it back about 2008. It was however one of the titles I know I lost in the flood of 5 years back. Too bad, because I have never found a replacement or seen it up on You-Tube since. One of Burr’s patented bad guy roles! “THE INTIMATE STRANGER” is not bad at all. Are these Republic B films coming up on television over there? They never show here on tv. All mine were acquired through trades with other collectors over the years. George Blair pretty well always hits the mark for me. Though I must admit I have not seen any of the westerns he did.
    Gord

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  19. If we’re very lucky, Gord, we might get a Republic on our Talking Pictures TV channel but “UNMASKED” is unlikely to be one of them. Bought my copy.

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  20. Gord, thanks for the second link. I have just watched “SPY HUNT” (1950) online. This is the film I ordered recently on DVD from a seller in the U.S. that appears to be a scam regrettably. I would still like to have it on DVD as I enjoyed it a lot. Film was made a year after Victor Canning’s novel “PANTHER’S MOON” was published and became a good seller. I have read many of Canning’s novels over the years and found much to enjoy.

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  21. FILMS FOR THE WEEKEND
    So far I have watched these three.
    1- THE MAN FROM DAKOTA 1940 US Civil War film with Wallace Beery, Delores Del Rio and John Howard in the leads. Beery and Howard are Confederate prisoner of war camp escapees who get mixed up with Del Rio. This leads to various run ins with Rebels, madmen etc. Not something I would watch again.

    2- Les Misérables 2019(France production) Violent Police film set in a slum in Paris. It follows a trio of elite anti-gang Police as they try to keep control of the area. The area has half a dozen factions fighting for control of the area.. We get to see the Police become just as nasty as the people they are trying to control. Not bad at all.

    3- CODE OF THE SECRET SERVICE 39 This is the second of the three Ron Reagan and Eddie Foy Jr Secret Service films. Pretty weak story here with the boys now in Mexico chasing the phony money producers. Nowhere as good as the other one of the series, SMASHING THE MONEY RING 1939 I have seen.
    Gord

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  22. Have watched two films that I think bear a mention, at the very least:-
    1) “OUTRAGE” (1950). This film tackles a subject that was avoided on film at that time and it tackles it head-on. It depicts the evil act of rape and its awful consequences (the word is not used). It comes as no surprise that it was produced by the Film Makers (Collier Young & Ida Lupino) and directed by Lupino. The film ‘introduced’ its two leads, Mala Powers and Tod Andrews and they were both excellent. Distributed by RKO. Well worth anyone’s time.

    2) “SULLY” (2016) was a true story that everyone remembers from 2009. I had missed it on release and I really shouldn’t have. Tom Hanks and Aaron Eckhart are superb as the two pilots and the film was produced and directed by Clint Eastwood (then aged 85!!). One of Clint’s best, and that’s saying something.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I haven’t seen “Outrage” yet but your description is intriguing so I plan to watch it. I checked it out on IMDB and noticed that the “Shoeshine Boy” is played by Hamilton Camp. Hamilton Camp had a single called “Here’s to You” that charted in the U.S. back in 1968. Useless trivia, I know, but it might take some down memory lane. Here’s Camp on the Glenn Campbell Show in ’68 singing with Campbell and Judy Collins.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for the link Frank,
        The song they are singing is “Less Of Me”
        written by Glenn Campbell,I also know the song from
        the Everly Brothers country rock album “Roots” and their
        version is on line as well.
        “Here’s To You” I have By Ian & Sylvia and I did
        not know Hamilton Camp did so much acting.
        I best remember him as the writer of “Pride Of Man” arguably the
        best track ever recorded by Quicksilver Messenger Service.
        OUTRAGE I have always wanted to see,the film has been much
        championed by Scorsese.
        Olive Films were supposed to release it some time back.
        Saw SULLY last night a riveting 90 minutes like Jerry I never saw
        this one in cinemas and wish that I had now.

        Like

        • Wow, Ian & Sylvia’s version of “Here’s to You” is so much better than Camp’s! I always liked Quicksilver’s versions of “Mona” and “Who Do Love” but never heard “Pride of Man.

          Like

          • John, Frank
            If you go to You-Tube, punch in Ian and Sylvia. Scroll down 6 or 7 and find The complete reunion concert in 1986 that includes Gordon Lightfoot, Judy Collins, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt. I think I spoke of this a while back with John. Have a look guys. You’ll never see this bunch together on the same stage again.
            Gord

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            • I really enjoyed “Obsession” aka “The Hidden Room”. I’ve loved Robert Newton since I watched him in “Odd Man Out” in 1967 when I was 18 (although I had seen him earlier in “Treasure Island” as a little kid.) I thought Naunton Wayne was terrific in “Obsession” as Superintendant Finsbury.

              Newton’s Bill Sykes in David Leans’ “Oliver Twist” (1948) is, to my mind, one of the greatest portrayals of an evil and venal man in the movies.

              Of course, I like Robert Newton as he played “Frank Gibbons” in Lean’s “This Happy Breed” (1944). (Charles McGraw also played a character named “Frank Gibbons” in “The Defiant Ones”).

              Like

            • Gordon,

              I’ve seen parts of this concert before and watched some more of it today. I think that Ian and Sylvia were great talents who had beautiful voices and were gifted songwriters. Sylvia wrote, “You Were on My Mind” which was a giant hit in 1965 by the We Five. Ian composed “Some Day Soon” which was made famous by Judy Collins.

              Like

              • Frank
                I have seen Ian 9-10 times in various venues here in Calgary. He lives on a ranch just out of town. Seen both together in Vancouver some years ago. Seen Lightfoot 3-4 times over the years. Great stuff. I watch that You Tube concert every 6 months or so.
                cheers, Gord

                Like

    • Jerry and ALL. Went ahead and took in OUTRAGE and sure glad I did. I was very much impressed with the interaction and dialogue between Mala Powers and Tod Andrews. I thought Andrews gave an inspired and sensitive performance with a non-religious spiritual undertone. When observing Powers, in many of her scenes, I felt I was witnessing a young Ida Lupino. Thinking Director Lupino must have had a hands on influence on Powers when acting out her scenes. Anyone else notice this?

      Like

      • I agree with all you said on “OUTRAGE”, Scott. Felt rather sorry for the fiancee, played well by Robert Clarke. Tod Andrews went on to star in the TV ‘western’ series “Mosby’s Marauders” later in the 50s, a series I have never seen.
        Great that my mini-review of “OUTRAGE” has sparked quite a bit of interest. I had never heard of it until recently and did not expect a little gem.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. Worked in the first episode of Bev Garland’s 1957-58 series, DECOY, that I found on You-Tube. Garland plays a NYPD Policewoman who gets assigned to various undercover operations. The episode had Betty Garde, Joanne Linville, Arch Johnson and Bruce Gordon in the cast. Real nice sharp looking print that looks like a studio release.
    Gord

    Like

  24. FILMS FOR THE WEEKEND
    The last two

    4- Sergeant Rutledge (1960) John Ford directs, Jeff Hunter is a Cavalry Officer defending Sgt Rutledge (Woody Strode) on charges of rape and murder. Court room drama with plenty of outside action due to an Apache uprising. Decent film.

    5- LOAN SHARK 1952 Despite not being a George Raft fan, I found this B-noir to be quite entertaining. Raft is a convict just out of prison. He moves in with his sister and brother-in-law. The brother-in-law gets murdered after threatening to go to the police about a loan shark racket. Raft decides on a little payback. He worms his way into the gang in-order to get the goods on the mob. Several well staged bouts of fist-i-cuffs and a blazing gun battle ensue before all is settled. Paul Stewart and John Hoyt support. Photographed by noir vet Joseph Biroc. He lensed, THE GLASS WALL, WORLD FOR RANSOM, CRY DANGER, FORTY GUNS, HUSH, HUSH SWEET CHARLOTTE, and FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX. A rather entertaining time-waster directed by Seymour Friedman.

    Like

    • A couple of items in the whatever they are worth column.
      George Raft was especially kind to me when I began my career. It is almost fashionable to dismiss his considerable career these days, but he was one of the biggest stars in the world, a great dancer, with a fine voice.

      Seymour Friedman was erudite and a gentleman of the highest order. Louis and June Hayward thought the world of him, and after his directing career he became a fine executive at Screen Gems, but he was one of the world’s worst commercial filmmakers of all time. The camera was never imaginatively placed, the players, including the stars, were seldom if ever presented in their best light., but his conversation was good. For Louis, other than a few Loen Wolf episodes, Seymour directed The Son of Dr. Jekyll and Louis’s second Saint picture, which marked the film series’ end, The Saints Girl Friday aka The Saint’s Return.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Barry
    One Raft film I always recommend to noir fans is, 1949’s, RED LIGHT, directed by Roy Del Ruth. Raft headlines a cast with Virginia Mayo, Ray Burr, Henry Morgan, Gene Lockhart, Arthur Franz and Barton MacLane. Raft is in good form as a man out to find the killer of his brother. Cinematographer Bert Glennon gives the whole thing a great look. Excellent film noir production.
    Gord

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  26. I take Barry’s point about George Raft being somewhat dismissed these days. His supposed Mob connections hurt his career later on it seems but I always enjoy his films. Maybe because he is one of my earliest screen memories. As a kid I used to adore “FABIAN OF THE YARD” on TV and when it went on a break it was replaced with George Raft’s “I AM THE LAW” series. Raft was still very popular then. I have a lot of his films and, while they are not classics necessarily, they always hit the spot for me. AND nobody wore a fedora and double-breasted well-cut suit better!

    Like

  27. To ALL……
    Just came across a fairly new George Raft entry online I had never seen before……..ESCAPE ROUTE a 1952 British thriller film, directed by Seymour Friedman and Peter Graham Scott, and co-starring Sally Gray and Clifford Evans. A pretty taut espionage effort and well played by all. Recommended for Raft followers.
    Quote Wikipedia……
    “It was made at Walton Studios and on location around London, mostly in the City of London, at a time when there was still much bomb damage from the Second World War.[4] American actress Coleen Gray was reported to have been cast opposite Raft, but the role was eventually played by the English star Sally Gray. It was one of several films made by British companies in connection with the low-budget American outfit Lippert Pictures, which distributed the film in the United States. It was made on a larger budget than most Lippert releases.”

    Like

  28. Scott
    LOL I just recorded that off TCM here last week. It is listed under the other title used for “Escape Route”, ” I’ll Get You”. One title for UK release, and another for US release would be my guess. Never seen it, but I have it up for the next batch of films to view for the upcoming weekend. Sally Gray was excellent in Edward Dmytryk’s “The Hidden Room”.
    Gordon

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    • Gordon……
      I also had never seen this film. I thought it was a pretty good B effort from Raft even though most critics do their usual bashing of anything Raft. But for those who have an appreciation of the onscreen presence of the man they will enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Gordon,

      OK let me try to get this reply where it belongs.

      I really enjoyed “Obsession” aka “The Hidden Room”. I’ve loved Robert Newton since I watched him in “Odd Man Out” in 1967 when I was 18 (although I had seen him earlier in “Treasure Island” as a little kid.) I thought Naunton Wayne was terrific in “Obsession” as Superintendant Finsbury.

      Newton’s Bill Sykes in David Leans’ “Oliver Twist” (1948) is, to my mind, one of the greatest portrayals of an evil and venal man in the movies.

      Of course, I like Robert Newton as he played “Frank Gibbons” in Lean’s “This Happy Breed” (1944). (Charles McGraw also played a character named “Frank Gibbons” in “The Defiant Ones”).

      Like

      • Frank
        LOL. As it so happens, OLIVER TWIST is another film I recorded off of TCM in the last 2 weeks. (GOOD TIME GIRL and THE LONG HAUL being another pair nabbed off TCM.) Been looking for TWIST for years and years. Hopefully I can get it up on the tv in a week or two. Other titles in front of it in the queue. Funny bit with the same name stuff.

        Have a great upcoming week.

        Gord

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  29. Silent Dust is one I need to take in again as it has been quite some time since watched. Obsession/The Hidden Room gets better every time I see it. Helps that the quality of the print has went from a 2nd gen vhs to a dvd.
    Gord

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  30. Scott, Gord and all
    “ESCAPE ROUTE” (1952) is a favourite Raft film for me – for several reasons. First, it is an enjoyable example of a post WW2 movie set in London; second, Sally Gray was a dish, and third is more personal. I started my working life in July 1967 in the City of London and worked there for the next 40 years. When I started it was 15 years after “Escape Route” was made but really London had not yet changed that much (plenty of bombed sites still being filled with new offices). Many of the locations in the film were familiar and easily recognisable to me. Real trip down Memory Lane!
    The City has changed out of all recognition now of course. Some of the new offices going up now are the third or fourth on the same site since 1967. Boy! That ages me.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Be great if you do make it to London, Gord. I should take great pleasure in volunteering to be your tour guide of all the best places (as well as talking endlessly about films). Who knows?

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  32. Lori Nelson R.I.P.
    Aug 1933 – Aug 2020
    Pretty Lori Nelson passed on the 23rd of Aug. While never a big name she did manage 2nd billing in REVENGE OF THE CREATURE 1955, TUMBLEWEED 1953 and 3rd billing in I DIED A THOUSAND TIMES 1955 and the Martin and Lewis comedy, PARDNERS 1956. She also had bit parts in BEND OF THE RIVER 1952, DESTRY 1954 and others before switching to television.

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  33. THE LONG HAUL name dropped recently is worth a look.
    An odd mixture of kitchen sink drama,Noir and trucker thriller.
    Interesting to see Big Vic down on his luck scuffling around
    Liverpool looking for work.
    The Mature/Diana Dors chemistry is pretty potent too.!
    Regarding films with great London locations,especially The City
    check out Val Guest’s THE WEAPON (1956) with two Hollywood
    leads Steve Cochran and Lizabeth Scott.
    Film is a good mirror into an now vanished London.
    Plenty of bomb site footage as well.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Gordon,
    Backtracking somewhat thanks so much for the link
    to the You Tube Ian & Sylvia concert.
    I was thrilled to see I & S perform a song with Linda Ronstadt
    another all time fave of mine.
    The song is Steve Gillette’s “Darcy Farrow” certainly one of the most
    moving songs ever written,covered many many times.
    I loved the way Gillette gave a traditional English type ballad a trasnatlantic twist.
    I thought I & S and Ronstadt’s vocals blended together very well indeed.

    Like

  35. I watched an excellent entry from George Sherman last night called “Backfire” (1950). It sports a great cast with Viveca Lindfors, Dane Clark, Virginia Mayo, Edmond O’Brien, Gordon MacCrae, and Ed Begley. Since Colin offers an excellent commentary on this film on RTHC so I won’t say too much about it. I will point out that Shelia MacCrae, Gordon’s wife, has a small but important roll in the film. Oh, and ignore that picture of Virginia Mayo on the poster for the film — strictly an enticement.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Sorry Frank;BACKFIRE was directed by Vincent Sherman.
    Oddly enough MGM wanted George Sherman to direct their
    Gable vehicle LONE STAR which made sense as it was similar
    to the pseudo historical pap that he had been grinding out at
    Universal in between really good pictures.
    Universal refused to release Sherman to MGM which Sherman’s
    buddy Budd Boetticher thought was a big mistake as Budd was convinced
    that Sherman could have enticed Gable over to Universal;imagine that
    Gable in a big budget Universal 50’s Western.
    LONE STAR in fact ended up being directed by Vincent Sherman,
    the film however is none too good despite it’s obvious star power.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Colin,I hope THE WEAPON gets the RTHC treatment,theres
    plenty to ponder over there.
    THE WEAPON is the sort of picture that the ill informed like to class
    as a B Picture these days.
    I saw it back in ’56 and it played as the main feature at the prestige
    Odeon circuit. The support feature was the Brit B movie HOME AND
    AWAY with Jack Warner. The second string Gaumont circuit that week were
    showing the Richard Widmark thriller RUN FOR THE SUN supported by
    the John Payne Western REBEL IN TOWN.
    The other major circuit ABC were showing SAILOR BEWARE supported
    by the tough Allied Artists thriller FINGER MAN.
    You sure had choice in those days.
    THE WEAPON was produced by Hal E Chester who started making
    Joe Palooka B Movies for Monogram.
    He moved up to A’s with Lesley Selander’s engaging swashbuckler
    THE HIGHWAYMEN which also played as the main fearure in the UK
    Chester also made a couple of interesting pictures directed by Lewis
    R Foster (bad Westerns,good Noirs) THE BOLD AND THE BRAVE an
    offbeat War Movie and the Noir CRASHOUT sometimes discussed here at RTHC.
    Chester later moved to the UK where he made the classic NIGHT OF THE DEMON,
    DeToth’s THE TWO HEADED SPY and the hit comedy SCHOOL FOR SCOUNDRELS
    among others.
    For those interested there are a whole host of the extensive London locations
    on the Reel Streets site for THE WEAPON.
    Yes,Gordon THE YELLOW BALOON is a cracker and it was granted an X
    certificate (over 16’s only) in the UK.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just a reminder that Jacques Tourneur was not happy with Hal E. Chester as a producer on NIGHT OF THE DEMON. It was Chester who insisted on an actual demon that Tourneur, consistent with his Val Lewton days, only wanted to suggest and leave to our imagination. Tourneur was right about this but mostly did get the atmospheric horror movie he wanted and there is not too much of that Demon. In the end it is one of his best movies.

      Thinking about the old days of double features and what some of those were always makes me feel a kind of pang, but also gratitude to have experienced that as part of my life.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Typo alert………….
    The Selander Swashbuckler mentioned above is of
    course THE HIGHWAYMAN.
    Film is a suitably grim,at times, take on the classic Noyes
    poem.
    THE HIGHWAYMAN is one of the few films to feature lovely
    Virginia Huston (THE DOOLINS OF OKLAHOMA,WOMEN FROM
    HEADQUARTERS) to bad that she never made more movies.

    Like

  39. Has anyone seen William Dieterle’s “Dark City” (1950) with Charlton Heston, Lizabeth Scott, and Viveca Lindfors? I watched it last night and thought it was very good. Terrific performances by the supporting cast — Dean Jagger, Ed Begley, Jack Webb, Harry Morgan, and Don Defore. I’ve never seen Webb better and Begley is terrific as a frightened, ulcer-plagued small-time gambler. Franz Waxman does the score and Lizabeth Scott (lip-syncing Trudy Stevens) sings some terrific songs. I guess Hal Wallis really wanted to showcase a young Heston; while the credits are rolling, the camera tracks him with a frontal shot for 1:28 minutes. It’s almost comical.

    Liked by 2 people

  40. Yes, Frank, I also rather like ” DARK CITY”. It was made (released) in 1950 which was a great year for all kinds of film, but perhaps crime/noir films especially (westerns too, come to think of it!). TV had not yet become “the threat” and Hollywood studios were producing some fine films with confidence.

    Like

  41. WEEKEND FILMS

    THE ROOKIE 1991 Clint Eastwood, Raul Julia, Sonia Braga (rewatch)
    I’LL GET YOU 1953 George Raft (first time watch)
    RED SUN 1971 Charles Bronson, Toshiro Mifune (rewatch)
    STRAY DOG 1949 Toshiro Mifune (First Watch)
    THE WINDOW 1949 Bobby Driscoll, Arthur Kennedy, Paul Stewart (rewatch)

    Like

  42. Gord, “THE WINDOW” is a personal favourite. The sense of menace towards the child by those two nasties is well done. The fact he is only a kid doesn’t faze them at all. Quite prepared to kill.

    I hope you enjoy “I’LL GET YOU”, which I believe we established was “ESCAPE ROUTE”, discussed earlier.

    I am not at home for the next week but will be keeping up with all you guys on here (no film watching for me though).

    Liked by 1 person

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