A Left and a Right

The fight game, with its allusions to glory and honor taking a ringside seat with corruption and manipulation, has often been featured in films noir, either peripherally or as a central plot element. Today, guest poster Gordon Gates focuses on a couple of boxing movies that don’t get talked about so much.

A double bill of boxing programmers with early Robert Ryan, Scott Brady and Richard Denning performances:
Golden Gloves (1940) & In This Corner (1948)
These two boxing films are early examples of what would become top flight noir films such as Champion, The Set-Up and The Harder They Fall.

First up is Golden Gloves from 1940

Richard Denning is an up and coming amateur boxer who makes a couple of bucks on the side, boxing for small time racketeer, J. Carrol Naish. Naish runs a string of boxing clubs that holds mismatched fights to packed crowds. “The people want knock-outs. So that is what i give them.” Robert Paige plays a newspaperman out to expose the racket which of course annoys Naish no end.

Paige arranges an amateur boxing tournament with straight up matches and proper refs, doctors etc. When George Ernest, the kid brother of Denning’s fiancée, Jeanne Cagney, is killed in one of Naish’s mismatches, Denning decides to join Paige and clean up the sport. Naish has other plans, and decides to wreck Paige’s next event by planting a ringer, Robert Ryan. (Ryan’s second credited role) Ryan’s job is to win the amateur event and then tell the papers he is really a pro.

This of course would destroy Paige’s attempt at cleaning up the sport. Naish now murders a boxer who threatens to spill the beans to the press. There is plenty of double dealing and knives to the back going on in this one. Edward Brophy, who plays a crooked manager, is a complete hoot to watch. Needless to say the last fight becomes a bout between Denning and the ringer, Ryan.

Denning manages to pull off a win to save the day while Naish and his gang are grabbed by John Law for the murder.

While I’m not saying this is an actual noir, there are plenty of flashes throughout the film. The cast and crew here would go on to be featured in many film noir.

The film was directed by Edward Dmytryk with help from an uncredited, Felix Feist. Dmytryk of course went on to helm the noirs Murder, My Sweet, Cornered, Crossfire, Obsession and The Sniper. Feist also dabbled in film noir with The Devil Thumbs a Ride, The Threat, The Man Who Cheated Himself, Tomorrow Is Another Day, The Basketball Fix and This Woman Is Dangerous included in his resume.

The D of P was Henry Sharp who lensed Ministry of Fear, The Glass Alibi, High Tide and Guilty.

The film was written by noir regulars Maxwell Shane, Fear in the Night, The Naked Street, The Glass Wall and Lewis R. Foster, who did Crashout and Manhandled.


Next up on the bill is In This Corner from 1948.
This one has Scott Brady in his third film and first lead, as a just out of the Navy scrapper who wants to become a pro boxer. He tells his girl, Anabel Shaw, that he is off to join an old Navy vet who manages a boxing club. Brady tells her that once he makes his fame and fortune, they can get married etc.

Brady finds the old vet has not managed a fighter in years and the club is just an old rooming house with himself as the only boxer. Brady sticks it out and is soon hired as a sparring partner at a club owned by a mobbed up manager, James Millican. Brady is soon signed to a contract by Millican after he decks a ranked fighter during a sparring bout.

Brady KO’s his first opponent and is soon moving up with 9 straight wins. His girl Shaw joins him and life looks good. That is till Millican informs him he is to take a dive in the next weekend’s fight. Millican’s mob is placing a large wager at long odds on Brady’s opponent, and his assistance is required. Brady is more than a little annoyed at this idea and tells Millican to get stuffed. Brady intends to win and to hell with the mob! Of course the mob has a back-up plan. They stick a punch-drunk boxer one step away from the morgue in with Brady to spar with. The boxer, Johnny Indrisano, goes down in a heap at the first punch and is hauled off to the hospital. It is the night of the fight, and Brady is getting ready to enter the ring when a telegram is delivered. It states that Indrisano has died from Brady’s punch to the head.

Needless to say this news throws Brady’s game off and he is savagely thrashed, just like the mob wanted. He asks for a re-match in 3 weeks and gets it. He trains hard but the death of Indrisano eats at him. The day of the fight, Brady sends Shaw off to see about helping out the dead boxer’s family. Imagine the surprise when Shaw finds no record of Indrisano’s death.

She digs deeper and discovers the whole thing was a mob ploy to upset Brady. She hunts down the quite alive Indrisano who is being stashed at Millican’s country house. Of course while all this is going on, Brady is again being pummeled in the ring. Shaw, the police and the just rescued Indrisano get to the arena just in time for Brady to rebound for a KO. Millican is grabbed up by the cops and the film is wrapped in just under an hour.

The director was Charles F. Riesner, whose claim to fame was Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill Jr and the Marx Brothers’ The Big Store. The D of P was Guy Roe who worked on noir such as, Railroaded, Behind Locked Doors, Trapped and Armored Car Robbery. The story is by Fred Niblo Jr who worked on Convicted, The Incident, The Bodyguard and The Wagons Roll at Night.

Ex-pug Johnny Indrisano sported a 64-9-4 record as a pro and beat several world champs during his career. He then became a character actor and a trainer for boxing films. He has bit parts in 99 River Street, Johnny Angel, The Bodyguard, Knock on Any Door, Tension, Borderline, Force of Evil, The Set-Up and about a dozen more noirs and numerous TV shows.

Nifty little low renter that is better than I make it sound.

——————————————————————————————————

Gordon Gates

56 thoughts on “A Left and a Right

  1. An interesting and enjoyable piece from Gordon. I find it interesting that Robert Ryan was a boxer in his second only credited role and 3 years later was a boxer again in “BEHIND THE RISING SUN” where he was pitted as a boxer against a Japanese wrestler (!). But then Ryan was a boxing champ in the Marines during service in WW2 so obviously it was something he had a talent for, taking it to a whole several levels up in RKO’s “THE SET-UP” (1949) which I consider the finest boxing film I have seen.
    As for “IN THIS CORNER”, this is a film I have never seen (not seen either of the films reviewed) and I note it was for Eagle-Lion Films who produced several rather fine movies in the late 1940s, several with Scott Brady.
    These are both films it would be good to see but they are seemingly very hard to find, especially the Brady film.
    Another very fine boxing film (not mentioned) is “BODY AND SOUL” (1947) starring the excellent John Garfield. This is a film I would rate up there in a similar level to “THE SET-UP”.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jerry
    I forgot to mention that in real life Brady could also box. He earned a light heavyweight boxing medal while in the service in WW2

    Gord.

    Like

  3. Something I’ve always found intriguing is the frequency with which elements of the fight game are woven into films noir. Gord’s piece above has highlighted a number of movies where the boxing connection is a major part of the plot. And yet there are so many where the fights are featured in some, let’s say, incidental way, where they don’t have prominence. Characters may have a history as fighters, they may perhaps have contacts among those involved in the sport in some way, key scenes are shot in the arenas or by the ringside. In some ways the whole milieu is as quintessentially noir as the slick, neon-lit sidewalks, or the perennial nightclubs.

    Sometimes I think it’s the fatalism and casual brutality of this offspring of the ancient gladiatorial contests that feeds into the noir sensibility, then on other occasions I wonder if it’s the spectacle and theatricality to be found at the heart of it all that draws the filmmakers attention – that microcosmic drama being played out within a larger drama. Or perhaps it’s combination of both.

    Like

    • The plotlines that bring in ‘fixed’ bouts to make some gangster a lot of money at the expense of the poor sap in the ring and the molls that are only around while the money lasts. Pure Film Noir!!

      Like

  4. Colin
    You say it far better than my limited writing skill could. To quote you, “Fatalism and casual brutality” or “spectacle and theatricality” hits the old nail square on the head. Boxing films are a fav with me as are the numerous tv episodes from the 50’s dealing with the same subject.

    Gord

    Like

  5. One of the best of the ‘incidental fight game Noirs’ is Phil Karlson’s excellent 99 RIVER STREET where John Payne’s ex-pug, reduced to working as a cabby, is hunted for the murder of his unfaithful wife (Peggie Castle) who plays around after Payne’s character tumbles into poverty. There’s a similarly-themed Brit Noir NO WAY BACK from 1949, in which ex-boxer Terence De Marney also stumbles into oblivion. This one, which deserves to be better known, has cracking location photography along the mean streets of post-war London and features a stunningly bleak denouement. Worth seeking out. I think it’s had a R2 DVD release from Renown and sometimes plays on TPTV. Also deserving an honorable mention is 1953’s THE SQUARE RING, directed by Basil Dearden, in which Robert Beatty’s ‘Kid Curtis’ takes on one fight too many.The original KID GALAHAD with Edward G and Bette Davis is another outstanding ‘Boxing Noir’ but I would agree with Jerry that THE SET-UP is probably the pinnacle of this particular genre. Speaking of Robert Ryan, I watched the beautiful new Warner Archive Blu of CROSSFIRE last night. A slightly contrived ending but otherwise simply excellent. The scene with Paul Kelly as The Man who haunts Gloria Grahame’s shoddy apartment is quintessential Noir..

    Like

  6. Nick
    Saw THE SQUARE RING 4-5 years ago and enjoyed the hell out of it. A nicely done boxing noir. Bill Owen was great in his role in the film. NO WAY BACK does not ring any bells so on the want list it goes..

    Thanks for the heads up on it.
    Gord

    Like

  7. This weekend I am taking in, 1962s PANIC IN THE YEAR ZERO. A very good low end sci-fi offering starring and directed by Ray Milland. A family hides out in the hills after a atomic attack on LA. Then if I have time, Bogies 1943 WW2 film, SAHARA.

    Gordon

    Like

  8. Colin
    $225,000 budget according IMDB which is not much at that time. I recall the first time I saw it and was really rocked by it. It was still the Cold War going on and we still did the once every so often “duck and cover” drills in school. Seems funny now, but it scared the poo out of us back then!!!!

    Gord

    Like

  9. The most heartbreaking of all “Pugs In Noir” must be Stanley Baker in Lewis Gilbert’s sublime THE GOOD DIE YOUNG. Baker is unforgettable in this picture.
    Regarding PANIC IN YEAR ZERO for me the finest of all of Milland’s efforts as director and yes I’ve seen A MAN ALONE. A nice companion piece to PANIC IN YEAR ZERO is Arch Oboler’s even lower budget FIVE (1951) total cost around about $90,000. Later in the 50’s cats like Roger Corman and Bert I Gordon made these threadbare budgets (often as low as $60,000) the drive in norm. FIVE is actually really FOUR as there is an elderly gent who soon exits the picture. What we are left with are a resourceful male (William Phipps), a pregnant woman (Susan Douglas) a philosophical black man (Charles Lampkin) and a white supremacist fascist (James Anderson). Oboler’s film despite it’s nothing budget is powerful and haunting and well recommended. I second the Warner Archive wonderful restoration of CROSSFIRE.

    Like

  10. All
    One boxing film I have never seen is the Universal-International production IRON MAN from 1951. This one stars Jeff Chandler, Evelyn Keyes and Stephen McNally. Directed by J. Pevney and shot by Carl Guthrie. It is another one with ex-pug Johnny Indrisano as an extra.( check the Brady film I did at the top)
    Have a copy of IRON MAN here somewhere so I should get on my horse and watch it. Any one here seen it?
    Gord

    Like

      • Gord and Colin, I picked up a copy of “IRON MAN” quite recently, have watched it and found it most worthwhile. Chandler is fine in it and McNally shines. I find myself increasingly appreciating the latter’s acting talent.
        Dig out your copy, Gord. I think you will find the effort worth it.

        Like

    • Yep, seen it Gord. Less what was going on in the ring it wasn’t bad. Director Pevney and the star players did what they could with a script that amounts to a load of tripe when it comes to what actually goes on in the ring. Nothing more than attempting to capitalize on a contrived imitation of Kirk Douglas (Champion) and Robert Ryan (The Set-Up) done two years prior.

      Now, if you want to see a film with meat on the bone, that deals with real life situations, in and out of the ring, a must see is “The Ring” 1952. As a plus you get to see a young Rita Moreno looking as lovely as she ever has. Highly recommend.

      Like

      • Scott
        Never hurts to have various opinions on any film. I will still give it a look this weekend. THE RING I do not know anything about, so I will add it to my list. Miss Moreno is always worth a look.!!!!!!!!!!
        Gord

        Like

  11. Jerry
    Glad to hear your take on IRON MAN. I will take it in this week if I can. A U-I film that I have yet to see., how embarrassing.
    Gord

    Like

  12. A few other mostly American boxing films from 1939 to 1957. By NO means a complete list.
    They Made Me a Criminal 1939 Drama Accused of murder, a boxing champ (John Garfield) becomes a fugitive.
    City for Conquest 1940 Drama James Cagney as a fighter who is blinded in the ring.
    Golden Gloves 1940 Drama A sportswriter sets out to clean up amateur boxing.
    Knockout 1941 Drama Arrogant boxer Johnny Rocket (Arthur Kennedy) has a manipulative manager.
    The Pittsburgh Kid 1941 Drama Real-life boxer Billy Conn plays a contender falsely accused of a murder.
    Gentleman Jim 1942 Biographical Light-hearted biopic, with Errol Flynn as heavyweight champ James J. Corbett.
    The Great John L. 1945 Biographical Boston strong boy John L. Sullivan wins the belt, battles the bottle.
    Body and Soul 1947 Film noir John Garfield is a boxer involved with corrupt promoters. Three Oscar nominations.
    Killer McCoy 1947 Drama Mickey Rooney fights to pay off his dad’s gambling debts.
    Whiplash 1948 Film noir A painter adopts the ring name “Mike Angelo” when he fights for a sadistic club owner.
    The Big Punch 1948 Drama Refusing to take a dive, an honest kid (Gordon MacRae) gets framed for a murder.
    The Set-Up 1949 Film noir A has-been boxer’s manager bets on him to lose, with dire consequences if he doesn’t.
    Champion 1949 Film noir An arrogant fighter (Kirk Douglas) makes it to the top, alienating all who care about him. Six Oscar nominations.
    The Golden Gloves Story 1950 Drama An amateur boxer falls in love with a referee’s daughter.
    Iron Man 1951 Drama A coal miner turned prizefighter loses control inside the ring.
    Day of the Fight 1951 Documentary Stanley Kubrick’s first film, a documentary on middleweight Walter Cartier.
    The Fighter 1952 Drama A story by Jack London about a fighter during the 1910 Mexican rebellion.
    The Square Ring 1952 Drama British film about one night’s events inside a boxing arena.
    Flesh and Fury 1952 Drama A deaf boxer (Tony Curtis) wins the title, undergoes an operation so he can hear.
    The Ring 1952 Drama A young Mexican (Lalo Ríos) seeks respect of Americans and love of a beauty (Rita Moreno).
    Glory Alley 1952 Drama Socks Barbarossa (Ralph Meeker) bolts from a New Orleans ring one night, without explanation.
    The Joe Louis Story 1953 Biographical The life and career of the longtime champ, played by Coley Wallace.
    The Flanagan Boy 1953 Drama British film about a rising ring star who falls for a millionaire’s wife.
    Champ for a Day 1953 Drama After his manager is murdered, a heavyweight schemes to get even.
    Tennessee Champ 1954 Drama A devoutly religious boy mistakenly believes he killed a boxer (Charles Bronson).
    The Long Gray Line 1955 Biographical A look at the 50-year career of Martin Maher who served as boxing instructor at West Point
    The Harder They Fall 1956 Film noir A former sportswriter (Humphrey Bogart) works for a mobster who fixes fights.
    Somebody Up There Likes Me 1956 Biographical Two-time Oscar-winner based on life of Rocky Graziano, played by Paul Newman.
    The Square Jungle 1956 Drama A grocery clerk (Tony Curtis) fights his way to the middleweight title.
    World in My Corner 1956 Drama New Jersey boy (Audie Murphy) seeks fame, fortune to impress millionaire’s daughter.
    The Leather Saint 1956 Drama A young Episcopalian minister (John Derek) boxes to raise funds for his church.
    Monkey on My Back 1957 Biographical Barney Ross’s boxing career leaves him with a morphine habit.
    The Crooked Circle 1957 Crooked manager sets up boxer for the mob.

    Gord

    Like

  13. Jerry
    And it is a not bad little film. Smith and Steve Brodie make a good team in this one. I have a write-up at the usual place if you are interested. Republic mainstay Joseph Kane does a good job of direction.

    Gord

    Like

  14. Folks
    My You-Tube wandering took me to a very nice film noir site. Go to You-Tube and type Chris T.
    THE GOOD DIE YOUNG should pop up. There are about 100 or so very nice looking prints at the site. UK and American films both. Some nice REPUBLIC stuff as well. Take a look my good people.

    Gord

    Like

  15. Colin
    Hellman’s TWO LANE BLACKTOP and COCKFIGHTER were big hits at the local drive-in as a double bill. I do recall they were held over several weeks in about 1975. Warren Oates and Harry Dean Stanton were great in both. The only other Hellman film I have seen is BACK DOOR TO HELL . The westerns are on one of my to do lists.
    Gord

    Like

  16. All
    I just recorded PICKUP ALLEY (INTERPOL)1957 off one of my cable channels. It is not one I am familiar with. Trevor Howard, Anita Ekberg and Victor Mature headline with John Gilling directing. What is the general opinion among you good people?

    Gordon

    Like

  17. I have always find any films from John Gilling quite entertaining. Trevor Howard, as a villian, was not that dynamic here as was in Run For The Sun etc. Victor Mature was his usual self and Anita was eye candy.

    Like

  18. Gord, I got it in the BluRay Noir series, third volume, and watched it relatively recently (had seen it on TV many moons ago). I think it is a pretty good film of its type and it looks terrific in hi-def.
    Trevor Howard was incapable of giving a bad performance and his villain is a little different here. Mature was underrated I think, seen as beefcake, but actually so much more.
    I think you might rather enjoy it.

    Like

    • Jerry……..I second that. A pretty good crime noir that takes the viewer all over the seedy side of Europe. Shot in CinemaScope was a plus, especially if one is able to see it in hi-def. Hi-def wasn’t available for me, but I’m sure if it had, it surely would have knocked it up a couple of more notches. The star players were all good as one might expect, but I thought #4 billed Bonar Colleano (Sullivan) stole the show with his role providing big added twists and turns to the plot. Gord, you should like this one.

      Like

      • Scott, Chris, Jerry etc Thanks for your answers to my query on PICKUP ALLEY. This is the kind of responses that I like from here. Scott, I agree with your take on Bonar Colleano, he is always a plus in any role, no matter how big or small.

        Gord

        Like

  19. Jerry
    Thanks for the info. With any luck I can get to it on the weekend. I likewise am a Howard fan so that is an added bonus. Tonight I watched Mitchum in MAN WITH A GUN which I had not seen for 15 or 20 years. What a great film.
    Gordon

    Like

  20. Referring back to the previous post and a point of interest raised by John Knight concerning the upcoming release by Network of the much-awaited TV series “DIAL 999”.
    My set arrived yesterday and I can report that Network have once again done the business. Print quality is terrific so that the London of the late 1950s comes alive. Canadian Robert Beatty was the star. He was a very popular star on the big and small screens in the 1940s to 60s and very likeable.
    Highly recommended to those who embrace this kind of thing.

    Like

    • Jerry, thanks very much for the feedback on this. It’s a series I’m certainly interested in and I’m pleased to hear it’s in good shape. I like Beatty and it’s good that the show afforded him the opportunity to move up from his usual supporting roles.

      Like

      • I agree, Colin, though Beatty had top-starred in British films for some while before the series (“GREEN FINGERS”, “AGAINST THE WIND”, PORTRAIT FROM LIFE”, “THE GENTLE GUNMAN”, “PORTRAIT OF ALISON” etc). He was personable and good leading man material.
        Bonar Colleano (who was killed much too young) was another transatlantic fella who made good in British films. Rarely the leading man though maybe.

        Like

  21. Good to hear the quality is top rate. I really liked the episodes of the series that I have seen. Beatty fit the part of a RCMP detective on transfer to Scotland Yard perfectly.
    Gord

    Like

  22. It is 3:45 in the am here, and I just finished PICKUP ALLEY. Quite the romp this one was, New York to London then Rome and Athens before back to New York. All to follow a shipment of heroin. Vic Mature as the Cop from Interpol and a rather nasty Trevor Howard as the drug kingpin headline. The film supplies plenty of violence and piles of bodies as it moves along at a rapid pace. Director John Gilling and cinematographer Ted Moore give the film a very nice look. Moore was the D of P on 6 or 7 of the Bond films like DR. NO, GOLDFINGER and THUNDERBALL. Scott and Jerry, you were right about Bonar Colleano adding to the finished product. All in all I was quite pleased with the film.

    Gord

    Like

  23. TO ALL….
    Hangtown Express just posted a slew of new Westerns in 720 Res on YouTube…….including “Man With The Gun”. GORD, in that you just saw this and liked it so much, did you see it in 720 Res? Just curious.

    Like

  24. Scott
    Seen quite a few dusters at HANGTOWN EXPRESS. Good site. “Man With The Gun”. that I just saw was recorded off one of my cable channels. OK for my needs. Next up from HANGTOWN is John Derek in “The Outcast” from 1954 with Jim Davis. Never seen it.

    Gord

    Like

    • Hi Gord…..
      I just took in two movies at HANGTOWN EXPRESS……..both in 720 res. which provided for a much better viewing experience.

      First one was a first time watch, “Tennessee’s Partner” 1955, co-starring John Payne, Ronald Reagan and Rhonda Fleming. A surprisingly good Technicolor western directed by Allan Dwan. Grade A production values for a B western making it pleasing to watch. Payne and Fleming carry much of the load, however, when Reagan is on screen, during timely intervals, he makes his presence known with a Reaganist type performance that fits very well with the character he portrays. Recommended.

      Second one…….a re-watch of “Dakota Incident” 1956. A Trucolor western with primary stars Linda Darnell and Dale Robertson in Indian territory. Not bad if you’re a Robertson fan.

      Like

  25. Today I will take in the first episode of the 1965-67 western series, “Laredo”. This is also something new for me. The series was not shown on the tube at the time where we were living. One station that only broadcast from noon to 10 at night weekdays and noon to 1 am on Friday and Sat. Now I have a zillion channels that I could not hope to watch in 100 years.

    Gord

    Like

  26. Gord, I remember “LAREDO” when it was first on. Had some good people in it but I have to confess to not being a fan of ‘comedy’ westerns.
    Have you watched “THE OUTCAST” yet? Super, fast-paced little Republic western that ticks all the right boxes for me. Be interested to hear your thoughts.

    Like

  27. Jerry,firstly thanks for the “heads up” regarding DIAL 999. I did not know it was even out yet, just ordered mine.
    Vintage film buffs are in for a treat tommorow regarding Talking Pictures TV. Firstly there’s THE WAY OUT with Mona Freeman and Gene Nelson.
    Then a real find THE GIRL ON THE PIER with Ron Randell and Veronica Hurst. These’s a “Look At Life” edition on Soho Coffee bars and another episode of INTERPOL CALLING. Finally theres a GIDEON’S WAY episode called “Gang War” possibly a series best with the very lovely Jane Merrow in Femme Fatale mode. Ending the day there is SATURDAY NIGHT OUT an engaging early 60’s Brit flick.
    GIRL ON THE PIER is a much sought after item among Brit B Movie buffs, in fact it’s a film thought lost. Veronica Hurst at the time also had a two picture deal with Allied Artists where she made the 3D thriller THE MAZE and the colonial adventure ROYAL AFRICAN RIFLES starring Louis Hayward and directed by Lesley Selander. Australian star Ron Randell flitted between Hollywood and the UK during the fifties. In Hollywood he made such diverse films as THE SHE CREATURE (a divertying thriller with an engaging veteran cast) and Lesley Selander’s DESERT SANDS a Foreign Legion romp for Bel Air pictures in color and Superscope. Randell’s broad performance as an “upper class twit” would not have been out of place in a Carry On film. Randell also headlined Allan Dwan’s final film MOST DANGEROUS MAN ALIVE a Sci-Fi thriller. Back in the UK Randell appeared in such diverse films as I AM A CAMERA and DAVY, as well as B Thrillers MORNING CALL and THE HOSTAGE. Before mainly appearing in TV series episodes Randell appeared in a few International efforts like Andre De Toth’s GOLD FOR THE CAESARS and Hugo Fregonese’s SAVAGE PAMPAS as well as Nick Ray’s KING OF KINGS…quiet a diverse career to say the least. Ron was married to the very exotic Laya Raki who Jerry will remember from the TV series “Crane”

    Like

    • John, my recorder is longingly set to pick up all the films you mentioned. I also rather fancy “THE BIG DAY” (1960) with Donald Pleasance and the comedy “THE CHAIN”.
      I have already watched and enjoyed the first 3 episodes of “DIAL 999”. Terrific casts of familiar faces are on hand and the London locations are a joy. When the Wolseley police cars get out into the ‘sticks’ the filming is local to where I lived as we were not that far from the film studios at Elstree.

      Like

  28. John
    As it so happens, I caught a 1965 episode of WILD, WILD WEST last month with Ron Randell as the main baddie. He played the leader of a gang of Mexican bandits. Some of those other titles you mention are heading for my want lists.

    Jerry
    LAREDO is a comedy? That lets the air out of my hope for a rough and tough shoot-em-up series. Oh well, I’ll start with instead with, TOMBSTONE TERRITORY, another series I have never seen.. As for THE OUTCAST. It will most likely be next weekend before I can get to it. .

    Scott
    Never seen either of those two films you mention though they are both on my to do list. “Tennessee’s Partner” 1955 and “Dakota Incident”

    Colin
    Nice write up on “Dakota Incident” .

    Gord

    Like

    • Gord, don’t let me put you off “LAREDO”. It was OK in its way. The series was previewed at the end of Season 3 of “THE VIRGINIAN” in the episode ‘We’ve Lost A Train’, my least favourite episode of that series.
      “TOMBSTONE TERRITORY” is very different; really good.

      Like

  29. Jerry

    Not a big fan of 60s comedy with only the odd exception that i like.. Things like GET SMART is what turned the crank for my funny bone. F-TROOP was good for couple of chuckles as was GREEN ACRES. “THE VIRGINIAN” was one of the all time best duster series. I rank it up there with THE HIGH CHAPARRAL and Clint Walkers’ CHEYENNE. There were of course other good series but these three are my favorite.

    Gord

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.